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Sir Harry George Wakelyn Smith, Letter

  • ZA HPRA A288
  • Fonds
  • 27 November 1851

Sealed letter written in King Williams town to Faku, Chief of the Pondo, condemning Faku's behavior 'You did most wrongly ... your conduct has been bad. Now I call upon you ... to fall on Kreli'.

Smith, Sir Harry George Wakelyn

Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje, Recordings

  • ZA HPRA A1742
  • Fonds
  • 16 October 1923

The recording of songs were made during a visit by Sol Plaatje to the UK, on behalf of the then South African National Native Congress (SANNC later ANC). They were recorded at the studios of the Gramophone Co. Ltd. In Hayes, Middlesex on 16 October 1923.

Sol Plaatje, singing, was accompanied by Sylvia Colenso on the piano, the daughter of Francis Ernest Colenso, son of the Bishop of Natal John William Colenso.

The record contains the very first recording of "Nkosi Sikelel iAfrica", also listed here as "Hark 'tis the Watchman's Cry".

The following songs are included:
"Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika", also known as "Hark 'tis the Watchman's Cry (Hymn in Sechuana)
"Lead Kindly Light" (Hymn in Sechuana)
"Pesheya Ko Tukela" (Across the Tugela, a Hlubi folk song)
"Singa Mawele" (We are Twins, Dance melody in IsiXhoza)
"A band of hard pressed men are we" (Hymn in IsiXhoza)
"The Kaffir Wedding Song" (J.K. Bhokwe) (Sung in IsiXhoza)

Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje

Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje, Siege diary

  • ZA HPRA A2550
  • Fonds
  • 1899 - 1900

Handwritten diary of Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje (1876-1932), interpreter, journalist, author and politician. The diary was written during the Siege of Mafeking, which took place during the South African War of 1899-1902. It contains the only known surviving written account of the Siege by an African. The first entry is dated Sunday, 29 October 1899, and the last entry Friday, 30March 1900.

The diary makes reference to entries in the Mafeking Mail, a newspaper which was published as a Special Siege Slip during the Siege of Mafeking from 1 November 1899 - 31 May 1900.

Further reference needs to be made to the Centenary Edition of "The Mafeking Diary of Sol T. Plaatje", edited by John Comaroff and Brian Willan with Solomon Molema and Andrew Reed, published in 1999:

The Centenary edition has been greatly improved from its first edition, providing the historical context around the diary, Sol Plaatje's life and the Siege of Mafeking during the Anglo-Boer war. At the same time it has included parts which the diary omits, and it explains circumstances and historical events around the diary:

1) A letter to which Sol Plaatje refers as "public property" in his entry of the 8 December 1899 in the text of his diary, and which he meant to reproduce, but which he omits thereafter. The letter was written by Colonel Baden-Powell to General Snyman, dated 8 December 1899, and it was reproduced in the Mafeking Mail on the 11 December 1899.

2) A document by Colonel Baden-Powell dealing with the writer's threat to penalize 'grumblers' when their compensation claims were considered after the siege, published in the Mafeking Mail, 29 March. The editors of the book chose to reproduce the document in full, following Plaatje's entry of Friday 30 March 1900, where he made reference to the document.

3) The entry for Friday 30 March 1900 is the last of Plaatje's diary. The editors of the book mention some further 20 sheets of blank paper remaining in the notebook in which the diary was written, which are no longer present.

4) The Introduction and Endnotes in the book mentions earlier notes, written on loose paper. One of these notes which has survived exists in the collection A979 of Silas Molema and Solomon Plaatje, in Aa3, General correspondence, 1916-1920. It is part of a page which contains a correspondence presumably written to Silas Molema, dated 28 November 1919, written in ink. The part related to Plaatje's notebook is written in pencil, and it has the page number 7 written above the text, which reads as follows: ".... applied these remarks in order to pull them together a bit. 'It will take them 12 months, shelling every day to completely destroy a town like [Mafeking]. They will only knock a house or two down. I saw some good rocks down at your place and if you remained behind them you are perfectly safe.' We spent some of the 48 hours in sleep, when it was night, and the balance in preparing shelters."

5) The last entry of 30 March 1900 is followed by a letter, which the editors of the book explain to be the copy of a letter from Plaatje to Isaiah Bud-M'belle, Plaatje's brother-in-law. Although undated it is said to have been written at the end of February 1900.

There are a further 3 pages which cannot be related to the diary but seem to originate from the same notebook.

Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje

Steyn Report Summary

  • ZA HPRA AG3288
  • Fonds
  • 1992-1993

Executive Summary of the Steyn Report.

Following a raid by the Goldstone Commission on the offices of the Directorate of Covert Collection (DCC), President De Klerk announced on the 18 November 1992, that an investigation into the activities of the DCC would be conducted and that General Pierre Steyn, a former Chief of Defence Force Staff, had been appointed to take charge of this investigation into Third Force activities.

Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC)

Swaziland Oral History Project

  • ZA HPRA A2760
  • Fonds
  • 1967-1993

Oral interviews related to the history of Swaziland and neighbouring regions, mostly taken from oral accounts of events passed down through clans. Mainly in SiSwati with English translations in some cases.

The bulk of the material dates from 1970, collected by Philip Bonner, and 1983, collected by Carolyn Hamilton, working with a number of SiSwati-speaking researchers and assistants. Some of the interviews were undertaken at the behest of Bonner and Hamilton. Others were undertaken at the behest of the Swazi King, Sobhuza II, or by the Swaziland Broadcasting Corporation and others were collected by or given to the Swaziland Oral History Project in the early 1980's.

The description of this collection is mainly based on the written information available on the outside of tapes and tape boxes, microfiche pockets, and on the covers of the 'jotters'. It was not possible to establish the exact content on the tapes, the microfiches and slides.

Wulf Sachs, African tragedy: the life story of a native doctor

  • ZA HPRA A2120
  • Fonds
  • 1944

The collection contains the typescript for "African tragedy: the life story of a native doctor", written by the Psycho-analyst Wulf Sachs.

There is no date on the typescript, it was received in 1944, and has 'Draft' written on its spine. The content is similar to "Black Anger" by W. Sachs, published in 1947, as it deals with the same character 'John'. But whereas "African tragedy" is told in the first person, "Black Anger", although including identical incidents, is written by Wulf Sachs as told to him by 'John'.

Sachs, Wulf

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